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Wheelock Workbook, the adj. "victorious."

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Wheelock Workbook, the adj. "victorious."

Postby christophershelt » Fri Sep 23, 2005 6:22 pm

To One and All (Uno Omnibusque)--
In the Wheelock Workbook (3rd edit. rev.), Chapter 8, p. 65, Vis Verborum, A1. The question asks:

"Victorious" derives from the Latin adjective_________________, which is formed from the noun "victoria."

There is no such adjective listed in Wheelock's Latin, 6th edition; however, The New College Latin & English Dictionary does have the adjective, "victrix, -icis, (fem. & neut. only)." So, I ask, how do we decline this adjective? And, if it is only used with feminine and neuter nouns, what would we do if we needed to qualify a masculine noun? How would I say, "victorious king," or, "victorious man?"

"rex ________," and, "vir _______."

Any insight will be appreciated. Thank you.

Chris
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Re: Wheelock Workbook, the adj. "victorious."

Postby benissimus » Fri Sep 23, 2005 6:43 pm

christophershelt wrote:To One and All (Uno Omnibusque)--
In the Wheelock Workbook (3rd edit. rev.), Chapter 8, p. 65, Vis Verborum, A1. The question asks:

"Victorious" derives from the Latin adjective_________________, which is formed from the noun "victoria."

The only adjective that fits that description is victoriosus, -a, -um, but it is not common at all. I can only imagine that there was some discussion on word formation in this section and you were to form it based on your knowledge.

There is no such adjective listed in Wheelock's Latin, 6th edition; however, The New College Latin & English Dictionary does have the adjective, "victrix, -icis, (fem. & neut. only)." So, I ask, how do we decline this adjective? And, if it is only used with feminine and neuter nouns, what would we do if we needed to qualify a masculine noun? How would I say, "victorious king," or, "victorious man?"

"rex ________," and, "vir _______."

The ending -(t)rix (e.g. victrix, ultrix, terminatrix, dominatrix, tonstrix) added to the 4th principal part of the verb is the feminine agent suffix, i.e. the feminine version of -or (e.g. victor, ultor, terminator, dominator, tonsor). Victrix is considered a full adjective but victor is a noun that is used like an adjective. Unless you have skipped ahead, you probably don't know how to use third declension adjectives, but "victorious king and victorious man" = rex victor et victor vir.
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
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