Textkit Logo

Chapter 18 - 2 questions

Are you learning Latin with Wheelock's Latin 6th Edition? Here's where you can meet other learners using this textbook. Use this board to ask questions and post your work for feedback.

Chapter 18 - 2 questions

Postby scave » Wed Aug 03, 2005 3:59 pm

In working on Wheelock's chapter 18, I have run into two things that have me stumped.
1. Adjectives - In lesson 16, two adj's are listed thus:
ingens, gen. ingentis, huge
senex, gen. senis, adj. and noun, old, aged
In chapter 18 workbook the phrase "by his own brave old father" is translated into Latin as "a patre forti seni suo" which makes it appear that senex declines. (Exercitationes D. #3) However, in Lectiones #2 the phrase "in mare ingens" is translated as "into the vast sea" which makes it appear as if ingens does not decline.
SO - do these ajd's decline? If so, do they follow the masculine/feminine pattern or the neuter pattern?

2. Practice and Review #11 - For the phrase "pecuniam nimis desiderant" how can I know what "nimis" modifies? How do I know if it's "too much desire" or "too much money?"
scave
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2005 10:29 pm

Re: Chapter 18 - 2 questions

Postby benissimus » Wed Aug 03, 2005 4:49 pm

scave wrote:In working on Wheelock's chapter 18, I have run into two things that have me stumped.
1. Adjectives - In lesson 16, two adj's are listed thus:
ingens, gen. ingentis, huge
senex, gen. senis, adj. and noun, old, aged
In chapter 18 workbook the phrase "by his own brave old father" is translated into Latin as "a patre forti seni suo" which makes it appear that senex declines. (Exercitationes D. #3) However, in Lectiones #2 the phrase "in mare ingens" is translated as "into the vast sea" which makes it appear as if ingens does not decline.
SO - do these ajd's decline? If so, do they follow the masculine/feminine pattern or the neuter pattern?

All adjectives can follow any of the three genders. Like nouns, adjectives that are in agreement with a neuter noun use the same form for nominative and accusative, which explains why mare ingens "does not decline" (it is in the neuter accusative, identical to the nominative). If it were "of the vast sea", for example, it would be maris ingentis. Almost all adjectives decline.

2. Practice and Review #11 - For the phrase "pecuniam nimis desiderant" how can I know what "nimis" modifies? How do I know if it's "too much desire" or "too much money?"

nimis is working as an adverb here, i.e. "desire money too much". If it were modifying pecunia, pecunia would be in the genitive.
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
User avatar
benissimus
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2733
Joined: Mon May 12, 2003 4:32 am
Location: Berkeley, California


Return to Wheelock's Latin

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 19 guests