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Ch 34, Catullus 51

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Ch 34, Catullus 51

Postby FiliusLunae » Thu Mar 17, 2005 9:28 am

In chapter 34, Catullus 51 reads:
"...
otium et reges prius et beatas perdidit urbes."

The answer key (from Texkit) reads "leisure and kings before have destroyed even prosperous cities."

However, I interpreted it as: "leisure has destroyed before both kings and wealthy cities."

The question is whether to treat "reges" as nominative or acussative. I interpreted it as accussative because of the "et" before it, so that it goes with "et beatas" and, consequently, with "urbes". If the second "et" had not been there, I would definitely have thought of "reges" as nominative.


P.S. While I'm asking about Wheelock, a tiny question I have been asking myself: Why does Wheelock label Catullus 13 in chapter 33 as "B.Y.O.B., etc., etc."?
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Re: Ch 34, Catullus 51

Postby benissimus » Thu Mar 17, 2005 9:58 am

FiliusLunae wrote:In chapter 34, Catullus 51 reads:
"...
otium et reges prius et beatas perdidit urbes."

The answer key (from Texkit) reads "leisure and kings before have destroyed even prosperous cities."

However, I interpreted it as: "leisure has destroyed before both kings and wealthy cities."

The question is whether to treat "reges" as nominative or acussative. I interpreted it as accussative because of the "et" before it, so that it goes with "et beatas" and, consequently, with "urbes". If the second "et" had not been there, I would definitely have thought of "reges" as nominative.

Are you sure you have the updated version of the key? This error should have been fixed in the last release. The third person singular ending of the verb makes it pretty clear that reges is accusative, but the et... et... construction is also a good indication.


P.S. While I'm asking about Wheelock, a tiny question I have been asking myself: Why does Wheelock label Catullus 13 in chapter 33 as "B.Y.O.B., etc., etc."?

The labels for the passages in Wheelock were added in more recent additions by the editors (sometimes in an attempt at humor), not by the Latin authors themselves. The phrase "Bring Your Own Beer" seems to fit the nature of the poem however, since the poet tells his friend that they will have a great dinner party if he brings all the food and drink and women.
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
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Postby FiliusLunae » Thu Mar 17, 2005 10:25 pm

Thanks, benissimus.
I guess I don't have the updated key. Hehe. I will download it as soon as I get home.

The labels for the passages in Wheelock were added in more recent additions by the editors (sometimes in an attempt at humor), not by the Latin authors themselves. The phrase "Bring Your Own Beer" seems to fit the nature of the poem however, since the poet tells his friend that they will have a great dinner party if he brings all the food and drink and women.

Yes, I know that the labels were added by the editors and not by the Latin authors. Hehe. As you say, these labels are often humorous, and they foretell what the outcome of the reading will be. I just had no idea what "B.Y.O.B., etc., etc." stood for.
Thank you, now I see the connection. :D
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