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Two Questions about Wheelock's

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Two Questions about Wheelock's

Postby ejpoche » Thu Dec 23, 2004 1:46 am

Hello Everyone, This is my first time using this forum.

My first Question is from the Sententiae Antiquae from Chapter 38.
"Paravisse divitias fuit multis hominibus non finis sed mutatio malorum."
No matter how hard I try I can't make any sense of this.

Also, I was wondering about what to do after I finished Wheelock's Latin. I have taught myself for the most part. I feel pretty confident with the grammar I have learned so far and rarely struggle with translating the Self-tutorial and Practice & Review exercises, but when it comes to the actual ancient passages I have had some trouble. I think that this is mainly due to a lack of commentary Wheelock's offers with these passages. Does anyone have any recommendations on what to do next?
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Re: Two Questions about Wheelock's

Postby Deses » Thu Dec 23, 2004 12:35 pm

ejpoche wrote:Hello Everyone, This is my first time using this forum.

My first Question is from the Sententiae Antiquae from Chapter 38.
"Paravisse divitias fuit multis hominibus non finis sed mutatio malorum."
No matter how hard I try I can't make any sense of this.



Greetings,

Paravisse is Perf. Infinitive of paro, parare (obtain)
divitias - Acc.Pl. of divitias, divitiae (wealth)

"To obtain wealth ..."

Multis hominibus is Dative (of disadvantage, I suppose :) )

You can probably figure out the rest

Also, I was wondering about what to do after I finished Wheelock's Latin. I have taught myself for the most part. I feel pretty confident with the grammar I have learned so far and rarely struggle with translating the Self-tutorial and Practice & Review exercises, but when it comes to the actual ancient passages I have had some trouble. I think that this is mainly due to a lack of commentary Wheelock's offers with these passages. Does anyone have any recommendations on what to do next?


Try Wheelock's Reader. It only has a few authors, so you will get a sense of their style. Another reader I like is "Aeneas to Augustus". It is a great overview of Roman history and literature with pretty good and to the point commentaries.

Also, you have to read some comprehensive grammar. Wheelock skips some things that you will not be able to get around without,

By the way, there is a rumor that somewhere sometime there was someone who never had trouble reading ancient passages. But this could not possiblly be true. :)
<a href="http://www.inrebus.com"> In Rebus: Latin quotes and phrases; Latin mottos; Windows interface for Latin Words </a>
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Re: Two Questions about Wheelock's

Postby phil » Fri Dec 24, 2004 1:49 am

Also, I was wondering about what to do after I finished Wheelock's Latin.


Hi, I found the 2nd Year Latin, and Latin Prose Composition to be good after I finished Wheelock. Both can be downloaded from Textkit. The first is a collection of short stories, not too difficult, (though I had to ask many questions here), but thay will help increase your vocab. Doing the composition really helps you get all the grammar rules solidly in your head.

hth
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