Textkit Logo

Agere

Are you learning Latin with Wheelock's Latin 6th Edition? Here's where you can meet other learners using this textbook. Use this board to ask questions and post your work for feedback.

Agere

Postby elduce » Fri Dec 10, 2004 4:03 pm

I find 'agere' a confusing verb. Wheelock's gives about five different definitions for it and in one exercise 'age, age' means 'come! come!'. What's the best usage?

Thank you.
ego amo megaforce
elduce
Textkit Member
 
Posts: 144
Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2004 1:55 am
Location: Connecticut, USA

Postby klewlis » Fri Dec 10, 2004 4:19 pm

that depends on what you're using it for. ;)

lots of words can mean different things depending on context. this is the case in any language, including english. it's all about context. :)
User avatar
klewlis
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 1593
Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2003 1:48 pm
Location: Vancouver, Canada

Postby benissimus » Fri Dec 10, 2004 6:11 pm

"lead" or "drive" covers most of its meanings. It really is somewhat of a generic verb, similar to and often translated as "do". You won't see it very often in Wheelock's except for in phrases such as gratias agere and vitam/tempus/aetatem/etc. agere. In gratias agere for example, you could think of it as meaning "to do thanks"; "to give thanks" is a less literal translation refinement. In the phrases where agere takes some amount of time (vita, tempus, etc.) as a direct object, it is usually best to translate as "to lead/pass ______ (e.g. a life, a year)".

Wheelock's gives about five different definitions for it and in one exercise 'age, age' means 'come! come!'.

This imperative form is not from the Latin agere but from the Greek equivalent. Latin has adopted the imperative form of the Greek word which explains why the meaning is so different from that of the corresponding Latin form.
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
User avatar
benissimus
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2733
Joined: Mon May 12, 2003 4:32 am
Location: Berkeley, California


Return to Wheelock's Latin

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 12 guests