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Verb question and pronounciation question

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Verb question and pronounciation question

Postby sigma957 » Tue Sep 21, 2004 6:54 pm

I've started Wheelocks, and still working on the first chapter.

I have a couple of questions.

I try to speak the words as I'm studying them. I'm having trouble with

"conservavi" (mark over the i)

Second, I want to use words in sentences of my own. Can you use a verb like this?

Peccare cogitant.

They plan to sin.

Thanks and I'm sure this is the first of many questions!

Barbara
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Postby Dacicus » Tue Sep 21, 2004 11:41 pm

Second, I want to use words in sentences of my own. Can you use a verb like this?

Peccare cogitant.
Yes, you can do that. Peccare is called a complementary infinitive in this case.
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Re: Verb question and pronounciation question

Postby benissimus » Tue Sep 21, 2004 11:41 pm

sigma957 wrote:"conservavi" (mark over the i)

Is there a particular reason this word seems difficult to pronounce? Many Latin sounds cannot be accurately represented in terms of English sounds, but it would be roughly pronounced:
cone-sehr-WAH-wee


Second, I want to use words in sentences of my own. Can you use a verb like this?

Peccare cogitant.

They plan to sin.

Yes, this is a legitimate use for cogito, -are. Making up your own sentences is key to developing the ability to generate good Latin text, and thinking in Latin. You do have to be somewhat cautious about using words in particular ways, since the Latin custom may be different, but you were right this time.

Some examples from real writers (thanks L&S):

cogitat recipere hunc in aedes, -Terence
"he intends to receive him into his house"

____ deducere exercitum, -Suetonius
"(plan) to lead the army away"

____ praedium parare, -Cato
"(intend) to prepare the estate"

____ cenare, -Cicero
"(plan) to have dinner"

Thanks and I'm sure this is the first of many questions!

Keep them coming :)
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
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