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Translation question

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Translation question

Postby Rhuiden » Tue Aug 24, 2004 2:54 am

I am having trouble with a Latin to English translation and was hoping someone here could help me. I always seem to have more trouble with questions. Here is the Latin (it is from Workbook for Wheelock's Latin 3rd edition page 34 # 4).

Quid de me et exitio patriae meae cogitas?

My problem comes with the "me et exitio" phrase. I believe that "exitio" is in the ablative case and should be translated as "by/with the destruction".

I think "patriae meae" to be in the genitive case and should be translated "of my fatherland/country".

My best guess at this point (and that truly is all that it is) is:

"What do you think about the destruction of me and my fatherland."

I am a bit embarassed to ask for help on what will probably be a simple solution but I appreciate any help anyone can provide.

Thanks,

Rhuiden
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Re: Translation question

Postby benissimus » Tue Aug 24, 2004 3:56 am

Rhuiden wrote:I am having trouble with a Latin to English translation and was hoping someone here could help me. I always seem to have more trouble with questions. Here is the Latin (it is from Workbook for Wheelock's Latin 3rd edition page 34 # 4).

Quid de me et exitio patriae meae cogitas?

My problem comes with the "me et exitio" phrase. I believe that "exitio" is in the ablative case and should be translated as "by/with the destruction".

I think "patriae meae" to be in the genitive case and should be translated "of my fatherland/country".

My best guess at this point (and that truly is all that it is) is:

"What do you think about the destruction of me and my fatherland."

It really says Quid de me et (de) exitio patriae meae cogitas?. It would be repetitive to say de twice, so both of the ablatives are being affected by the single de. Neither one of them means "by/with/etc.", they are both prepositional ablatives. So, it really says "What do you think about me and (about) the destruction of my fatherland?".

I am a bit embarassed to ask for help on what will probably be a simple solution but I appreciate any help anyone can provide.

Nothing to be embarrassed about. Check back in the forum far enough (or not so far...) and you will probably catch me embarrassing myself :?
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
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Postby Rhuiden » Tue Aug 24, 2004 4:06 am

That makes sense,

Thanks
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