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38 Latin Stories ( groton & may)

PostPosted: Tue Feb 17, 2004 12:56 am
by katexedge
Does anyone have a translation for Caesar's Camp is Attacked by Belgians, or knows where I could possibly find one?

PostPosted: Tue Feb 17, 2004 7:12 pm
by phil
I have the book, but not an answer key. What chapter is that?, and tomorrow I'll post my translation if I've got one (so long as everybody promises not to laugh).

PostPosted: Tue Feb 17, 2004 10:22 pm
by katexedge
It is Chapter 24, and ANYTHING at all would be really appreciated, I've been struggling through this thing with no luck at all.

PostPosted: Wed Feb 18, 2004 7:16 pm
by phil
The last paragraph:
Caesari omnia uno tempore erant agenda: vexillum ponendum, signum tuba dandum, quod eos iussit arma tollere; a labore revocandi milites; acies paranda. Quarum rerum magnam partem brevitas temporis et hostium adventus impediebat. Itaque duces, propter propinquitatem et celeritatem hostium, Caesaris imperium non exspectabant, sed per se ea quae videbantur faciebant.

We agree on the first sentence:
Caesar had to do everything at once: raise the flag, sound the trumpet, which ordered them to pick up their weapons, to call back the soldiers from their labours, and to prepare the battle lines.

The second sentence got me baffled until I identified the two nouns in the nominative: brevitas temporis the shortness of time and hostium adventus the approach of the enemy. Now although there are two nouns, the verb impediebat is only singular, but it applies to both nouns, so they both were impeding. They must have been impeding something in the accusative: magnam partem a large part . A large part of what? quarum rerum of which matters (i.e. the raising of the flag etc). The shortness of time, and the approach of the enemy were impeding a large part of these preparations.

After that, the last sentence doesn't need much discussion.
Therefore, because of the proximity and the speed of the enemy, the leaders were not waiting for Caesar's commands, but by themselves were doing as they saw best.

PostPosted: Wed Feb 18, 2004 8:50 pm
by katexedge
Thank you so much !

PostPosted: Wed Feb 18, 2004 9:40 pm
by klewlis
phil rocks.

:)

PostPosted: Wed Feb 18, 2004 11:23 pm
by katexedge
Yeah he does ! three cheers for phil

PostPosted: Wed Feb 18, 2004 11:34 pm
by phil
aw shucks... :oops:

full key?

PostPosted: Tue Apr 20, 2004 11:27 pm
by gfreek3
I have been having trouble with the 38 latin stories too, and was wondering if anyone knows where I can find a full key for the book. I would post specific translation questions, but they are too many in number and occur weekly.

gfreek3

Re: full key?

PostPosted: Wed Apr 21, 2004 12:18 am
by benissimus
gfreek3 wrote:I have been having trouble with the 38 latin stories too, and was wondering if anyone knows where I can find a full key for the book. I would post specific translation questions, but they are too many in number and occur weekly.

gfreek3

With no offense intended, if you are having problems with translating everything you read, you probably need to go back and do some heavy review or maybe get a tutor. Reading how translations are supposed to be might clarify things, but it won't really teach you Latin and you will only be converting into English and not understanding the Latin.

It's natural to have difficulty with the language, but you really will benefit more from understanding where your mistakes were and not from seeing merely what you should have done.

Re: full key?

PostPosted: Wed Apr 21, 2004 1:05 am
by phil
gfreek3 wrote:I have been having trouble with the 38 latin stories too, and was wondering if anyone knows where I can find a full key for the book. I would post specific translation questions, but they are too many in number and occur weekly.
Weekly! That's nothing! When I was going through Wheelock, I was posting questions daily, even hourly a times. Do post questions here, that's what this forum is all about after all. After sucking all that knowledge from the board members, I'm only too happy to give something back where I can.
Mind you, as rightly Benissimus says, if you are having too many problems, you may be trying to go too quickly. Try to identify exactly what each problem is. There is nothing in the 38 stories (other than vocab) which isn't taught in Wheelock (assuming you're using Wheelock), so if you're stuck, you may have glossed over or misunderstood something in your study.