Textkit Logo

Beginner question: Conservate me ; servate me

Are you learning Latin with Wheelock's Latin 6th Edition? Here's where you can meet other learners using this textbook. Use this board to ask questions and post your work for feedback.

Beginner question: Conservate me ; servate me

Postby Cleo » Wed Dec 31, 2003 4:13 am

Warning, this is a beginner question...

Chapter 1, Sententiae 7, Conservate me!
The answer key published here says protect me.
Yet, in the optional exercices, #20 is also Conservate me, with the answer in Wheelock as save me.

Another example is Apollo me saepe servat, translated here as Appollo often saves me.

So what would be the difference between conservate me, and servate me? I assume it's some sort of nuance that I am not catching. From my first reading of the chapter, I understood "servare" as protect, and "conservare" as save, but first readings are often wrong. I am now looking for guidance.

Oh, and Happy New year! Bonne année.
phpbb
User avatar
Cleo
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 29
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2003 3:09 am
Location: Montreal, Canada

Postby klewlis » Wed Dec 31, 2003 4:33 am

they are relatively interchangeable (and as far as wheelock is concerned, they are completely interchangeable). the difference appears to be slight, so I guess it would depend on context. According to my dictionary, servo seems to have an added meaning of "look after", in addition to "saving" and such.
User avatar
klewlis
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 1602
Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2003 1:48 pm
Location: Vancouver, Canada

that bugs me...

Postby Cleo » Wed Dec 31, 2003 4:37 am

Thanks for answering this quickly!

It bugs me that they are interchangeable. One would be "look after me before I am in actual trouble", and the other ought to be "take care of me now because I am in trouble now!!"

Anyway, it may be my 21st century mind that doesnt grasp the concept. Or maybe context is needed. Sentences rarely stand alone.

Thanks.
phpbb
User avatar
Cleo
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 29
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2003 3:09 am
Location: Montreal, Canada

Postby Episcopus » Wed Dec 31, 2003 9:50 pm

The con verbal prefix is very often intensive, for example: facere - to make, do. conficere (con+facere) - to accomplish, complete, finish.
User avatar
Episcopus
Textkit Zealot
 
Posts: 2563
Joined: Sat Jun 14, 2003 8:57 pm

Postby benissimus » Thu Jan 01, 2004 6:39 pm

As Episcopus said, the con- prefix intensifies the verb. So, Wheelock has supplied the word "protect" as a more intensive choice for "save", but as long as you understand that one is a bit more emphatic than the other, you can translate with whatever meaning you wish.
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
User avatar
benissimus
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2733
Joined: Mon May 12, 2003 4:32 am
Location: Berkeley, California


Return to Wheelock's Latin

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests