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§. 382. Exercises I (~5) & II. (~4)

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§. 382. Exercises I (~5) & II. (~4)

Postby Episcopus » Sat Nov 29, 2003 2:42 pm

This exercise was easy, apart from one in latin which did not make sense to me. I know that it's probably something retarded that I did not see, so ne pas rire! (The first 5 are boring velle nolle malle drills that I checked myself, also thus are the first 3 of II.)

I. 5. Sole oriente, aves cantare inceperunt.
The sun rising, the birds began to sing.

6. Clamoribus auditis, barbari progredi recusabant.
Having heard the shouts, the barbarians began to refuse to advance.

7. Caesare legiones hortato, milites paulo fortius pugnaverunt.
After Caesar had encouraged the legions, the soldiers fought a little more bravely.

8. His rebus cognitis, Helvetii finitimis persuaserunt ut secum iter facerent.
When they were aware of these matters the Helvetii persuaded their neighbours to make a march with them.

*is the 'secum' referring to the Helvetii, as they are the subject?

9. Laboribus confectis milites a Caesare quaerebant ut sibi praemia daret.
As they had completed their work the soldiers asked that Caesar give them rewards...or...the soldiers from Caesar asked that he give them rewards...

This is the one that I just don't understand, I had a guess but I don't know how 'a Caesare' would go in there to make sense. Why would any soldier come from Caesar and ask that he give them rewards...there can't be a personal agent there surely. And does the 'sibi' refer to the soliders as they are the subject?

10. Concilio convocato principes ita responderunt.
When the council was called together the chiefs responded thus.

11. Dux plurís diés in Helvetiorum finibus morans multos vicos incendit.
The leader, whilst delaying on the Helvetii Borders for quite a few days set fire to many villages.

12. Magnitudine Germanorum cognita, quídam ex Romanis timebant.
Having learned the magnitude of the Germans, certain Romans began to fear.

13. Mercatoribus rogatis, Caesar nihilo plus reperire potuit.
Though he had asked the merchants Caesar could find nothing more.

II. 4. Caesar, when he heard the rumour, commanded that the legions move more quickly.
Rumore audito Caesar imperavit ut legiones velocius progrederentur.

5. Since Caesar was leader the men were willing to make the journey.
Caesare duce viri iter facere volebant.

6. A few, terrified by the reports which they had heard, preferred to remain at home.
Pauci perterriti rumoribus auditis manere domi maluerunt.

7. After these had been left behind the rest hastened as quickly as possible.
His relicitis reliqui muniverunt quam velocissime.

8. After Caesar had undertaken the business he was willing to delay no longer.
Caesar negitio suscepto diutius morari noluit.

...Latin is very efficient is is not! No postquam thanks very much! I've heard some say the ablative absolute to be hard...it's funny and facile.
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Re: §. 382. Exercises I (~5) & II. (~4)

Postby Skylax » Sat Nov 29, 2003 5:08 pm

Episcopus wrote:ne pas rire!

Celui qui rirait ne jugerait que lui-même!

I.

6. Clamoribus auditis, barbari progredi recusabant.
Having heard the shouts, the barbarians began to refuse to advance.

Why "began"? (also in n° 12)
8. His rebus cognitis, Helvetii finitimis persuaserunt ut secum iter facerent.
When they were aware of these matters the Helvetii persuaded their neighbours to make a march with them.

*is the 'secum' referring to the Helvetii, as they are the subject?

'secum' is in a "substantive" clause (here this clause plays the role of direct object) and refers to the subject of the main verb.

9. Laboribus confectis milites a Caesare quaerebant ut sibi praemia daret.
As they had completed their work the soldiers asked Caesar that he give them rewards

This is the one that I just don't understand, I had a guess but I don't know how 'a Caesare' would go in there to make sense. Why would any soldier come from Caesar and ask that he give them rewards...there can't be a personal agent there surely. And does the 'sibi' refer to the soliders as they are the subject?

There is nothing to worry about!
Quaero ab, meaning to ask (something) "from" someone is the Latin way to express "to ask somebody something" (French : "demander quelque chose à quelqu'un")

Hereafter, all your answers are correct. It is high quality Latin : Your Grace can be proud of it.
II. 4. Caesar, when he heard the rumour, commanded that the legions move more quickly.
Rumore audito Caesar imperavit ut legiones velocius (celerius, citius) progrederentur.

5. Since Caesar was leader the men were willing to make the journey.
Caesare duce viri iter facere volebant.

6. A few, terrified by the reports which they had heard, preferred to remain at home.
Pauci perterriti rumoribus auditis manere domi maluerunt.

7. After these had been left behind the rest hastened as quickly as possible.
His relicitis reliqui muniverunt quam velocissime.


8. After Caesar had undertaken the business he was willing to delay no longer.
Caesar negotio suscepto diutius morari noluit.
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Postby Episcopus » Sat Nov 29, 2003 5:45 pm

I.

6. Clamoribus auditis, barbari progredi recusabant.
Having heard the shouts, the barbarians began to refuse to advance.

Why "began"? (also in n° 12)

-> It sounded to bring out the meaning of the sentences better, and sometimes I thought the imperfect may mean "began to" as an incomplete action.

*is the 'secum' referring to the Helvetii, as they are the subject?

'secum' is in a "substantive" clause (here this clause plays the role of direct object) and refers to the subject of the main verb.

--> So 'secum' is 'with the Helvetii'? I have done substantive clauses but I don't quite understand how this works...

"Quaerere ab" - "demander quelque chose a quelqu'un" - Dr. D'Ooge did not tell me that one! Thankyou

And in this sentence 'sibi' refers to the soldiers? How would you say "...that Caesar give rewards to himself"?

Celui qui rirait ne jugerait que lui-même!

--> Alors celui-ci est moi! Je ris chaque fois que je fais un erreur...je ris a cause de mes reponses souvent, mais aussi je suis fier :) Merci
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