Textkit Logo

BLD § 249 Latin-English EXERCISES

Are you learning Latin with D'Ooge's Beginners Latin Book? Here's where you can meet other learners using this textbook. Use this board to ask questions and post your work for feedback and comments from others.

BLD § 249 Latin-English EXERCISES

Postby Timothy » Fri Jul 30, 2004 3:38 am

I The First Bridge over the Rhine

1 Salus sociorum erat semper cara Romanis. Olim Galli, amici Romanorum, multas inurias ab Germanis qui trans
2 flumen Rhenum vivebant acceperant. Ubi legati ab iis ad Caesarem imperatorem Romanorum venerunt et
3 auxilium postulaverunt, Romani magnas interibus ad hostium finis properaverunt. Mox ad ripas magni fluminis
4 venerunt. Imperator studebat copias suas trans fluvium ducere, sed nulla via poterat. Nullas navis habebat. Alta
5 erat aqua. Imperator autem, vir clara, numquam adversa fortuna commotus, novum consilium cepit. Iussit suos in
6 lato flumine facere pontem. Numquam antea pons in Rheno visus erat. Hostes ubi pontem quem Romani facerant
7 viderunt, summo terrore commotis, sine mora fugam parare inceperunt.


The safety of the allies was always a care of the Romans. In former times the Gauls, friends of the Romans, many injuries from the Germans, who across the river Rhine were living, received. When the ambassadors from them to Caesar general of the Romans came and aid requested, the Romans by a long road to the enemy border hastened. Soon to the banks of the great river they came. The general was eager his forces across the river to lead, but no way was possible. He had no boats. Deep was the water. The general at that time, a famous man, never by adverse fortune excited, a new plan made.
He ordered his men on the wide river to make a bridge. Never before a bridge on the Rhine had been seen. The enemy when the bridge which the Romans were making saw, by the greatest terror were excited, without delay their flight to prepare began

The saftey of (their) allies was always a concern for the Romans. In former times the Gauls, frineds of the Romans, received many injuries from the Germans who were living across the Rhine river. When the ambassadors from there came to Caesar, the general of the Romans, and requested aid the Romans hastened by a forced march to the enemy border. Soon they came to the banks of the great river. The general was eager to lead his forces across the river but there was no way possible. He had no boats. The water was deep. At that time the general, a famous man, never excited by adverse fortune made a new plan. He ordered his men to build a bridge over the wide river. Never before had a bridge been seen on the Rhine. When the enemy saw the bridge which the Romans were making they were excited with the greatest terror and without delay began to prepare their flight.

- Tim
phpbb
User avatar
Timothy
Textkit Enthusiast
 
Posts: 374
Joined: Sat Apr 03, 2004 3:16 pm
Location: Baltimore

Re: BLD § 249 Latin-English EXERCISES

Postby ingrid70 » Mon Aug 02, 2004 9:28 pm

I'm back :).

Just a few notes (and many thanks, I've corrected quite a few errors in my version - I'm a bit sloppy doing these translations: using deep river instead of wide river etc.):

salus-cara: safety = dear to the Romans (dear is adjective, not the substantive cura-

ambassadors from there = from them (ab iis); or is this free translation?

imperator autem: the general, however (not 'at that time', he was never ever moved by adversity :))

pontem quem Romani facerant: had made, not were making (it was finished before they knew it, apparently)

Hope this helps.

Ingrid
ingrid70
Textkit Enthusiast
 
Posts: 394
Joined: Wed Dec 04, 2002 6:29 pm
Location: The Netherlands

Postby Timothy » Tue Aug 03, 2004 2:08 am

I'm back.

Happy, happy! Joy, joy! I hope you had a wonderful time!


Just a few notes (and many thanks, I've corrected quite a few errors in my version - I'm a bit sloppy doing these translations: using deep river instead of wide river etc.):

Well, I'm just getting started on sloppy. And lazy.

salus-cara: safety = dear to the Romans (dear is adjective, not the substantive cura-

Right. I think this was a memory error and I mistook the root. "...dear to the Romans."

ambassadors from there = from them (ab iis); or is this free translation?

I threw caution to the winds. :D Actually, this sentence seemed as if it had too may words. I expected a genitive (eorum) but that might be too much English and not enough Latin. Still it seemed to me that iis was not quite clear, or at least definite, as to which ambassadors Caesar received: Gaul or German? When I reworked the sentence it didn't seem to become any clearer. Nevertheless, it is people not a place.

imperator autem: the general, however (not 'at that time', he was never ever moved by adversity)

Another memory fault. This was one of those cases where the Latin made sense and the English didn't.

pontem quem Romani facerant: had made, not were making (it was finished before they knew it, apparently)

Right. Geez! What were they doing then? At that point it's too late to prepare to flee...

Glad you're back safe and sound.

- tim
phpbb
User avatar
Timothy
Textkit Enthusiast
 
Posts: 374
Joined: Sat Apr 03, 2004 3:16 pm
Location: Baltimore


Return to Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests