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§ 245 Latin- English Exercises

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§ 245 Latin- English Exercises

Postby Timothy » Thu Jul 15, 2004 2:40 am

1 Quam urbem videmus?
What city do we see?
Urbs quam vides est Roma.
The city you see is Rome.

2 Cives Romani urbem suam turribus altis et muris longis muniverant.
The Roman citizens had fortified their city with tall towers and long walls.

3 Venti navis longas prohibebant finibus hostium adpropinquare.
The winds had prevented the long boats from approaching the enemy's country.

4 Imperator a clientibus suis calcaria auri et alia insignia accepit.
The general from his retainers a golden spur and other insignia received.
The general received from his retainers a golden spur and other insignia.


5 Milties Romani cum hostibus bella saeva gesserunt et eos caede magna superaverunt.
The Roman soldiers were waging a savage war against the enemy and defeated them with great slaughter.

6 Alia animalia terra, alia mare amant.
Some animals love land, others the sea.

7 Naves longae quae auxilium ad imperatorem portabant igni ab hostibus deletae sunt.
The long boats which aid for the general carried by fire from the enemy were destroyed.
The long boats, which carried aid for the general, were destroyed with fire from the enemy.


8 In eo mari avis multas vidimus quae longe a terra volaverant.
In this sea many bird we have seen which far from land have flown.
We have seen many birds in this sea which have flown far from land.


9 Nonne viditis navis longas hostium et ignis quibus urbs nostra vastabatur?
Didn't you see the long boats of the enemy and the fire which our city destroyed?
Didn't you see the long boats of the enemy and the fire which destroyed our city?

Certe, sed nec caedem civium nec fugam clientium vidimus.
Yes, but neither the slaughter of the citizens nor the flight of the retainers did we see.
Yes, but we saw neither the slaughter of the citizens nor the flight of the retainers.


10 Aves et alia anilmalia, ubi igni viderunt, salutem fuga petere celeriter inceperunt.
The birds and other animals, when they saw the city fire, sought safety in flight quickly they began.
The birds and other animals, when they saw the city fire, quickly sought safety by flight.


11 Num iudex in peditum ordinibus stabat?
Was the judge standing with the ordinary footmen?
Minime, iudex erat apud equites et equus eius insigne pulchrum gerebat.
No, the judge was among the equites and his horse wore a beautiful insignia.

- Tim
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Postby Titus Marius Crispus » Thu Jul 15, 2004 2:48 am

Timothy wrote:3 Venti navis longas prohibebant finibus hostium adpropinquare.
The winds had prevented the long boats from approaching the enemy's country.

Is 'had ____ed' an acceptable translation of the imperfect? I've always been taught to use 'were _____ing', 'used to ______', or (rarely) '[have] _____ed'.

Timothy wrote:8 In eo mari avis multas vidimus quae longe a terra volaverant.
In this sea many bird we have seen which far from land have flown.
We have seen many birds in this sea which have flown far from land.


Perhaps "We saw many birds in this sea which had flown far from land." The pluperfect happened before the perfect in the main clause.

Also, on number 11, you must have learned differently, but I was taught that 'num' was translated 'surely...not...?'.
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Postby Timothy » Thu Jul 15, 2004 3:10 am

Titus Marius Crispus wrote:Is 'had ____ed' an acceptable translation of the imperfect? I've always been taught to use 'were _____ing', 'used to ______', or (rarely) '[have] _____ed'.


No, I think you're right and it's imperfect. "were preventing"

Titus Marius Crispus wrote:
Timothy wrote:8 In eo mari avis multas vidimus quae longe a terra volaverant.
In this sea many bird we have seen which far from land have flown.
We have seen many birds in this sea which have flown far from land.

Perhaps "We saw many birds in this sea which had flown far from land." The pluperfect happened before the perfect in the main clause.


Yep, that makes sense.

Titus Marius Crispus wrote:Also, on number 11, you must have learned differently, but I was taught that 'num' was translated 'surely...not...?'.


I saw it as the prefix of the interrogative question expecting a negative answer; Num venit He isn't coming, is he? But I didn't phrase it correctly.

Thanks, that was helpful!

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