Textkit Logo

BLD § 240 Terror Cimbrius

Are you learning Latin with D'Ooge's Beginners Latin Book? Here's where you can meet other learners using this textbook. Use this board to ask questions and post your work for feedback and comments from others.

BLD § 240 Terror Cimbrius

Postby Timothy » Sun Jul 11, 2004 1:30 pm

Becasue this is "new" material that isn't an edit change of the key, I've decided to make it a separate topic. I'm hesitating because it may bloat the forum topic list but my intention is to make it easier for people to locate sections of interest.

Other opinions welcomed.


§ 240 Terror Cimbrius

 1 Olim Cimbri et Teutones populi Germaniae, cum feminis liberisque
 2 Italiae adpropinqaverant et copias Romani maximo proelio vicerant.
 3 Ubi fuga legionum nuntiata est, summus erat terror totius Romanae, et
 4 Romani, graviter commoti, sacra crebra deis faciebant et salutem petebant.
 5
 6 Tum Manlius orator animos populi ita confirmavit: "Magnam
 7 calamitatem accepimus. Oppida nostra a Cimbris Teutonibusque
 8 capiuntur, agricolae interficuntur, agri vastantur, copiae barbarorum
 9 Romae adpropinquant. Itaque, nisi novis animus proelium novun
10 faciemus et Germanos ex patria nostra sine mora agemus, erit nulla
11 salus feminis nostris liberisque. Servate liberos! Servate patriam!
12 Antea superate summus quia imperatores nostri fuerunt infirmi. Nunc
13 Marius, clarus imperator, qui iam multas alias victorias reportavit,
14 legiones ducet et animos nostros terrore Cimbrico libreare maturabit."
15
16 Manlius tum in Africa bellum gerebat. Sine mora ex Africa in Italiam
17 vocatus est. Copias novas non solum toti Italiae sed etiam
18 provinciis sociorum imperavit. Disciplina autem dura laboribusque
19 perpetuis milites execuit. Tum cum pedibus equitibusque, qui iam
20 proelio studebant, as Germanorum castra celeriter properavit. Diu et
21 acriter pugnatum est. Denique barbari fugerunt et multi in fuga ab
22 equitibus sunt interfecti. Marius pater patriae vocatus est.

Once upon a time the Cimbri and Teutons, with their women and children came near to Italy and the forces of the Romans were defeated in a great battle. When the flight of the legions was announced, it was the greatest terror of all Romans, and the Romans, gravely excited, made frequent sacrifice to the gods and sought safety.

At that time the orator Manlius strengthened the people's spirit thus: "Great calamities we have received. Our towns have been captured by the Cimbri and the Teutons, our farmers killed, our fields devastated, the barbarian forces draw near to Rome. And so unless we make a new battle with a new spirit and drive the Germans from our fatherland without delay it will not be safe for our women and children. Save the children! Save the fatherland! Before we were defeated because out generals were weak. Now, Marius, the famous general, who has won won many other victories already, shall lead the legions and will hasten to free our spirits from the Cimbri terror.

At that time Manlius was waging war in Africa. Without delay he was called out of Africa to Italy. He has levied new forces not only from Italy but also from the provinces of our allies. Moreover, he has trained the soldiers by constant discipline and hard labor. Then with the solders and cavalry who were already eager for battle he quickly hastened to the German fort For a long time and fiercely the battle was fought. At last the barbarians took flight and many in flight were killed by the cavalry. Marius was called father of the country.

- Tim
phpbb
User avatar
Timothy
Textkit Enthusiast
 
Posts: 374
Joined: Sat Apr 03, 2004 3:16 pm
Location: Baltimore

Postby ingrid70 » Sun Jul 11, 2004 8:08 pm

Hi Tim,

I'm going to do some nitpicking for you. But you'll be pleased to hear that I also changed my version because of yours: it's a two-way street.

line 1: you've forgotten the "populi Germaniae"
line 2: the clause is active and the copias Romani are in the accusative
both tenses are pluperfect: they happened before the rest of the story.
line 3: i'd make the 'summus' predicative: the terror was great.

I was wondering myself why Romanae (i.e. why female). Perhaps the legions again: the terror of the all of the Roman legions was great?

line 4: sacra is plural, but I suppose that's a typing error.

line 7: only one calamity :).
line 9: more than one spirit
line 14: cimbricus is an adjective: Cimbrian
line 17: you forgot toti.
line 18: our allies: you're a Roman now? That's what I call immersion learning :). hard discipline and continuous labour(s).
line 20: more than one fort, or else one camp.

Hope this helps.
Ingrid
ingrid70
Textkit Enthusiast
 
Posts: 394
Joined: Wed Dec 04, 2002 6:29 pm
Location: The Netherlands

Postby Timothy » Mon Jul 12, 2004 2:16 am

ingrid70 wrote:I'm going to do some nitpicking for you. But you'll be pleased to hear that I also changed my version because of yours: it's a two-way street.

Please do; I'm bound to either make a mistake or simply post a mistake. I ecstatic that I'm doing as well as I am. And, as always, your comments are very helpful.
ingrid70 wrote:line 1: you've forgotten the "populi Germaniae"
line 2: the clause is active and the copias Romani are in the accusative
both tenses are pluperfect: they happened before the rest of the story.
line 3: i'd make the 'summus' predicative: the terror was great.

Agreed. That switch of the subject was unconscious. Hmmm.

ingrid70 wrote:I was wondering myself why Romanae (i.e. why female). Perhaps the legions again: the terror of the all of the Roman legions was great?

My guess was that it was refering to the women and children in a panic although from other texts I've gathered that really wasn't the case.

ingrid70 wrote:line 4: sacra is plural, but I suppose that's a typing error.

I wish; It's in my notes as singular. As a translation exercise I went too fast here and should have spent more time on it.

ingrid70 wrote:line 7: only one calamity :).
line 9: more than one spirit
line 14: cimbricus is an adjective: Cimbrian
line 17: you forgot toti.
line 18: our allies: you're a Roman now? That's what I call immersion learning :). hard discipline and continuous labour(s).
line 20: more than one fort, or else one camp.

Agreed. I threw in the "our" because I get the sense that this is a fable told to children as history lesson. It seems to make sense following the quote from Manlius. None the less, I will claim citizenship when I finish the book...or maybe the next one. Or at least when I get my denaris. :lol:

Thanks again!

- Tim
phpbb
User avatar
Timothy
Textkit Enthusiast
 
Posts: 374
Joined: Sat Apr 03, 2004 3:16 pm
Location: Baltimore


Return to Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 13 guests

cron