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Question Ex. 107

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Question Ex. 107

Postby Radek » Wed Feb 04, 2004 5:32 pm

II. 6.
In English
The german with sons and daughters are hastening with horses and wagons
In key there is:
Germani cum filis fialibusque cum equis et carris properant

Why not: Germani cum filis fialibusque equis et carris properant :?:
(equis et carris - ablative of means - withaut cum)
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Re: Question Ex. 107

Postby benissimus » Wed Feb 04, 2004 6:36 pm

Radek wrote:II. 6.
In English
The german with sons and daughters are hastening with horses and wagons
In key there is:
Germani cum filis fialibusque cum equis et carris properant

Why not: Germani cum filis fialibusque equis et carris properant :?:
(equis et carris - ablative of means - withaut cum)


First of all, the subject of the sentence should be Germanus, if the subject is "The German" or else the English should be "The Germans". Also, fialibus should be filiabus.

You have to have a cum when you are discussing accompaniment. If someone or something is accompanying, then you will almost always have a cum.

Ablative of Means is exactly what the name implies: it is the means by which something is done. Before deciding something is an Ablative of Means, ask yourself if you can replace the English "with" with "by means of". So, if the intended meaning of the sentence is "The Germans with sons and daughters are hastening by means of (with) horses and wagons", then you could use an Ablative of Means. If they are simply bringing horses and wagons with them, then it is a cum+ablative.

I'm not sure which one is the intended answer, but they both seem to make sense.
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
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Postby Radek » Wed Feb 04, 2004 7:04 pm

Thanks for you request
I think you right and both version are correct :lol:

(There should be The Germans of course (and fialiabusque), there wewre my mistakes) :oops:
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Postby jsc01 » Fri Feb 06, 2004 6:58 pm

I translated this as:

Germani, cum filiis filiabusque, carris et equis properant.

I don't understand the need for the second cum in the answer key (the one in front of equis). I though carris and equis donoted an ablative of means case in which cum is never used.
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