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Split from Do I understand Caesura?

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Split from Do I understand Caesura?

Postby brainout » Mon Jul 04, 2016 3:38 pm

So how many syllables do you count after the third foot, in the first line? 8?

jeidsath wrote:Here I am simply breaking on the third foot every time.

Image


I think occurrences of the same structure might be in Matt24-25, that's why I ask; looks like it depends on how you pronounce the dipthongs. Thank you for your time!
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Re: Do I understand Caesura?

Postby jeidsath » Wed Jul 06, 2016 2:14 pm

@brainout, see Smyth 138 for the syllable counting rule in Greek. Homeric verse is in dactylic hexameter. Here is an example in English:

THIS is the forest primeval. / / / / / The murmuring pines and the hemlocks,
Bearded with moss, and in garments / / / / / green, indistinct in the twilight,

There is nothing at all similar in the New Testament. I am afraid that you have got that wrong. In Greek, it's not about counting the number of syllables, it's about the alteration of long and short syllables. Homer's metre is a pattern of "long short short" repeated six times, where the two shorts are allowed to resolve into a single long, and the final syllable is always counted long. Take the second line in the image above and see if you can work out the long and the short syllables.

οὐλομένην, ἣ μυρί’ Ἀχαιοῖς ἄλγε’ ἔθηκε,

EDIT: I wrote iambic hexameter at first, and mwh noticed and corrected me. An iambic hexameter would be (though pentameter is more common)

da DUM da DUM da DUM da DUM da DUM da DUM

Dactylic hexameter is

DUM da da DUM da da DUM da da DUM da da DUM da da DUM da da
Joel Eidsath -- jeidsath@gmail.com

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Re: Do I understand Caesura?

Postby brainout » Thu Jul 07, 2016 4:08 am

Okay, I didn't make myself clear. I'm not contending that the NT uses Homeric Greek meter, though the case can be made for some passages. I'm just asking about the syllable count YOU apply here, as it looks like the first line is 9 syllables, depending on how you pronounce the dipthongs.

Re counting syllables itself, I explained why that matters for other reasons very much a part of the NT, click here (golly I hope I can put links in related to this forum).
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