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Greek Vocabulary in the context of weather

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Greek Vocabulary in the context of weather

Postby uberdwayne » Sat Jul 20, 2013 2:05 pm

ἥλιος, ου, ὁ - the sun
εὔριπος, ου, ὁ - air conditioner, fan
λαμπω - I shine (λαμπει ὁ ἥλιος = the sun shines)
καῦμα, ατος, το - heat, especially from the sun
ψυχρὸν, ου, το - cold
θερμὸν, ου, το - hot
βροχή, ης, ἡ - rain

feel free to add and correct as neccessary, I will continue to add words as we go :)
μείζων ἐστὶν ὁ ἐν ὑμῖν ἢ ὁ ἐν τῷ κόσμῳ
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Re: Greek Vocabulary in the context of weather

Postby daivid » Mon Jul 22, 2013 1:03 pm

These words I have already posted but in a separate thread. As it makes sense to have one thread I am reposting here:

This is from my database of weather words.
I first used "Reading Greek" which has its own system of classifying noun declensions.
Hence 3a is the most common 3rd declension for feminine and masculine nouns.
I may change it to the more conventional nom + gen form.
Definitions as relevant to weather rather than full definitions of course/

ἄνυδρος, arid, -ος-ον
θερινός, sumertime, θ. τροπαί or τροπή, -η-ον
θερμος, hot, warm , -η-ον
μεταβολικός, changeable, , -η-ον
πολιός, gray , -α-ον
ὑγρός, wet, soft , -α-ον
ψυχρός, cold , -α-ον
αηρ, air αερ-, 3a, m
αἰθὴρ, ether, heaven, air, αἰθέρ-, 3a, m
αἰθρια, clear weather, clear sky , 1b, f
ἄνεμος, wind , storm , 2a, m
ἀστραπή, lightning , 1a, f
βορέας, the north wind , 1d, m
βροντή, thunder , 1a, f
βροχή, rain, irrigation, , 1a, f
εἴλησις, heat of the sun , 3e, f
εὐδία, fair weather , 1b, f
ἥλιος, sun , 2a, m
θερμασία, warmth, heat , 1b, f
καῦμα, burning heat καῦματ-, 3b, n
κεραυνος, lightning, 1a, m
κρυμός, icy cold, frost, cold fit, winter time , 2a, m
κύανος, f:color blue, . m/f
νεφέλη, cloud, darkness , 1a, f
νίφα, snow , 1c, f
νιφετός, falling snow, snowstorm, , 2a, m
ὀμίχλη, mist, 1a, f
οὐρανός, sky, 2a, m
πνευμα, wind, 3b, n
σκιάδειον, sunshade ie unbrella 2b, n
τάχος, velocity , 3c, n
ὑγρασία, wetness , 1b, f
ὑετός, rain, esp. a heavy shower , 2a, m
χεῖμα, cold, frost, χείματ-, 3b, n
χειμων, winter, storm,suffering χειμων-, 3a, m
χιων, snow χιον, 3a, f
βρέχω, rain, make wet
δευω, wet, drench
θερμαίνω, heat
κᾰλύπτω, cover (clouds -> sky)
λαμπω, shine, be bright
νίφω, snow
πνέω, blow ie wind
συννεφέω, be cloudy
φλέγω, blaze,
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Re: Greek Vocabulary in the context of weather

Postby Markos » Thu Aug 15, 2013 5:59 pm

Make sure you check out this helpful thread:

viewtopic.php?f=12&t=60357

This phraseology tends to be more fancy, more Attic, than the basic (some would say barbaric) Koine diction that we tend to use. It's all good. I note that he offers εὐδία ἐστιν whereas I have been writing εὐδίαν ἔχομεν, but the latter is found in the GNT. There is always a lot of ways to same the same thing in Ancient Greek.
Last edited by Markos on Fri Aug 16, 2013 8:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Greek Vocabulary in the context of weather

Postby daivid » Fri Aug 16, 2013 1:24 am

This is Rico's system of times of the day:
6 [6-9] ὄρθρος
6-9 [9-12] πρωία
12-15 μεσημβρία
15-18 ἑσπέρα
18-21 ὁψέ
21-24 μεσονύκτιον
0-3 ἀλεκτροφωνία
3-6 πρωί

The bit in square brackets is what I think he must have intended. Surely he can't have intended a gap between 9 and 12. But he may actually have inteded it as actually written. Is it the same in editions other than the Italian (which mine is)?

Also didn't the Greeks split the day into equal parts and the night into equal parts? Hence where Rico writes 6 we should really take it to be day break?

This isn't actually a weather thing but as writing about the weather means saying when things happened it is a weather-thread thing.

Markos wrote:Make sure you check out this helpful thread:

viewtopic.php?f=12&t=60357

I completely ignored that due to the Latin tittle. Thanks.
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Re: Greek Vocabulary in the context of weather

Postby Markos » Fri Aug 16, 2013 9:21 pm

daivid wrote:This is Rico's system of times of the day:
6 [6-9] ὄρθρος
6-9 [9-12] πρωία
12-15 μεσημβρία
15-18 ἑσπέρα
18-21 ὁψέ
21-24 μεσονύκτιον
0-3 ἀλεκτροφωνία
3-6 πρωί

The bit in square brackets is what I think he must have intended. Surely he can't have intended a gap between 9 and 12. But he may actually have inteded it as actually written. Is it the same in editions other than the Italian (which mine is)?


The chart is the same in my French edition. It's a good question. I'm not sure what he intends. Maybe 10:00 a.m and 11:00 a.m. are a sort of "dead zone" in the sources and we simply aren't clear on what to call this and where to categorize it. In English we call this, I think, "mid-morning," which really only makes sense from the perspective of a work day, and if the Greeks had such a term (μεσοπρωί?) I think it might mean 5:00 a.m. to them.

I don't know how precise these terms were. I would think they varied from region to region and speaker to speaker. I'll tell you what. I will write Rico and ask him if it's a typo. He has been gracious enough over the years to respond to my e-mails. I never know in what language to write him. His English is a lot better than my French, and his Greek is a lot better than my Greek. For that matter, his Greek is better than my English. :D I'll try to get, while I'm at it, an update on when the new (English) edition is coming out.

I completely ignored that due to the Latin tittle. Thanks.


Tell me about it. It reminds me of what Steve Martin said about the French; It's like they have a different word for everything!
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Re: Greek Vocabulary in the context of weather

Postby daivid » Tue Aug 20, 2013 10:58 pm

Markos wrote:
I don't know how precise these terms were. I would think they varied from region to region and speaker to speaker. I'll tell you what. I will write Rico and ask him if it's a typo. He has been gracious enough over the years to respond to my e-mails. I never know in what language to write him.

That would be useful. If you haven't already written you might as whether 6 means actually 6 or sunrise an hence will be earlier in summer and later in winter.
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