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Datives used as derivational morphological prefix

This was originally a question asked in Herodotus 1.189 νηυσιπέρητος
Markos wrote:
ἑκηβόλος wrote:Are there other similar word formations, where the dative of means becomes part of the word itself?
νηυσί (ναυσί) πέρητος (περατός) -> νηυσιπέρητος

χαῖρε, φίλε Στέφανε.

Maybe νυκτικρυφής?

νυκτικρυφὴς ὁ ἥλιος. ἡ γὰρ νὺξ κρύπτει τὸν ἥλιον. ὁ οὖν ἥλιος τῇ νυκτὶ ἐκρύβη.

On the other hand, Λ.Σ.Κ. renders this as: ὁ κρυπτόμενος τὴν νύκτα.

ἔρρωσο.

Yes. You were wise to ignore my stipulation of "dative ...
Read more : Datives used as derivational morphological prefix | Views : 196 | Replies : 2 | Forum : Learning Greek




The imperfect of ἀντιβολεω

In Lysias 1.25 I came across the imperfect of ἀντιβολεω: ἠντεβόλει. My question is, why does there seem to be two augments, the η and the ε? eg why isn't it like ἀντεβολει or ἠντιβολει?
Read more : The imperfect of ἀντιβολεω | Views : 198 | Replies : 2 | Forum : Learning Greek


Is this an articular infinitive? Lysias 1.21

ἀξιῶ δέ σε ἐπ᾽ αὐτοφώρῳ ταῦτά μοι ἐπιδεῖξαι: ἐγὼ γὰρ οὐδὲν δέομαι λόγων, ἀλλὰ τὸ ἔργον φανερὸν γενέσθαι, εἴπερ οὕτως ἔχει.

I'm struggling to figure out how the bit in bold works, and am not quite sure what το goes with. There are two scenarios I'm not sure which to choose between:

1. This is some sort of indirect statement, where το just goes with ἐργον, meaning: 'for I have no need of words, but ...
Read more : Is this an articular infinitive? Lysias 1.21 | Views : 253 | Replies : 4 | Forum : Learning Greek


How to translate this phrase? Lysias 1.21

εἶπον ἐγώ, ‘ὅπως τοίνυν ταῦτα μηδεὶς ἀνθρώπων πεύσεται: εἰ δέ μή, οὐδέν σοι κύριον ἔσται τῶν πρὸς ἔμ᾽ ὡμολογημένων...'

I rendered it 'none of the things agreed with me will hold true/be valid', but the προς is throwing me off...I'm not sure if this translation is okay, or it's better to say 'to me' ('agreed to me' or maybe 'acknowledged to me')?

I think he's talking about their agreement that if she told him the ...
Read more : How to translate this phrase? Lysias 1.21 | Views : 223 | Replies : 2 | Forum : Learning Greek


Is this a relative clause or indirect question?

κἀκείνη τὸ μὲν πρῶτον ἔξαρνος ἦν, καὶ ποιεῖν ἐκέλευεν ὅ τι βούλομαι: οὐδὲν γὰρ εἰδέναι.
Lysias 1.19

'what I wanted' - I think it may be an indirect question, but the main verb ('ἐκελευεν') makes me doubt this, because it's not a verb of asking, deliberating etc. Could it be a relative clause, or was I correct in thinking it's an indirect question?
Read more : Is this a relative clause or indirect question? | Views : 513 | Replies : 16 | Forum : Learning Greek


What verb does ὑπο go with here? Lysias 1.11

προϊόντος δὲ τοῦ χρόνου, ὦ ἄνδρες, ἧκον μὲν ἀπροσδοκήτως ἐξ ἀγροῦ, μετὰ δὲ τὸ δεῖπνον τὸ παιδίον ἐβόα καὶ ἐδυσκόλαινεν ὑπὸ τῆς θεραπαίνης ἐπίτηδες λυπούμενον, ἵνα ταῦτα ποιῇ: ὁ γὰρ ἄνθρωπος ἔνδον ἦν

It seems to me to go with the participle λυπούμενον - 'it was irritated, being distressed (better: 'because it was being distressed') on purpose by the maid'; ie ὑπο + gen to express agent with a passive participle.

I'm not sure though ...
Read more : What verb does ὑπο go with here? Lysias 1.11 | Views : 288 | Replies : 4 | Forum : Learning Greek


Vergil's First Eclogue - with Cowboys!

Cari amici, enamored with my new home's desert landscape, I couldn't help put an American Western twist on one of my favorite pieces of Latin literature, the First Eclogue by Vergil, in this recitation of it I did recently:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pZMEB_5TC-s&t=2s

A couple fun quiz questions for you:
1. There is a reference to a lightning strike — can you find the real one in the scenery?
2. I hoped ...
Read more : Vergil's First Eclogue - with Cowboys! | Views : 273 | Replies : 1 | Forum : Learning Latin


Where is the bathroom?

Any thoughts on how one would say, "where is the toilette?" in ancient Greek....or it's equivalent, since toilets were a rarity back then?
Read more : Where is the bathroom? | Views : 346 | Replies : 4 | Forum : Learning Greek


Great Courses Greek 101

https://www.thegreatcourses.com/courses ... guage.html

Apparently The Great Courses has a Greek 101 video series that goes through the first sections of Pharr. Has anybody taken a look at it? It looks like it might be good for self-learners.
Read more : Great Courses Greek 101 | Views : 282 | Replies : 0 | Forum : Learning Greek


 

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