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I'm sure you all know Ennius, the Latin poet.
His Annales only came to us by fragments. So we can find a fragment of Ennius in Cicero, de divinatione I, 48.

I found a sentence and I understand the Latin, but I have difficulties to translate this in proper Dutch, cause the English translation is a bit odd to me.

Exin candida se radiis dedit icta foras lux.

icta radiis (I found this in a ...
Read more : Ennius | Views : 785 | Replies : 4 | Forum : Learning Latin



An apt reciprocation

(thanks to Episcopus)
Read more : Oxford | Views : 1017 | Replies : 0 | Forum : Open Board

Invenit qui non quaerit

He who does not search finds.

Althought I made this up myself, this is derived strongly from Buddhist wisdom which I endorse very much so.

I would not like to explain this quote at this moment, but I ám wondering if there is anyone who recognizes himself in these poetic words and finds himself not searching?
Read more : Invenit qui non quaerit | Views : 8674 | Replies : 15 | Forum : The Academy

Indoeuropean reflects of "shwa"

Hello, I'm new around here so I'm not quite sure how this thing works. :roll: However, if someone has anything on "shwa" issue, it would be nice to let me know.
Read more : Indoeuropean reflects of "shwa" | Views : 1965 | Replies : 10 | Forum : Open Board

fieri potest ut iam scias...sed


You may already know, but Oxford has recognised textkit.
Read more : fieri potest ut iam scias...sed | Views : 430 | Replies : 2 | Forum : Open Board

Participle Q

Friday night and practising my Greek --now that is cool :!:

Example: "I didn't punish the slave who had not done his work."

I know that the finite verb in the main clause must be in the aorist tense (i.e., e)ko/lasa). I do not want to use a subordinate relative clause but a partiiciple instead; therefore, the participle in this example must be in the aorist aspect ...
Read more : Participle Q | Views : 858 | Replies : 2 | Forum : Learning Greek

"there is" translation

How does one translate the English phrase "there is/are" into Latin?

If I wanted to translate "There is a cat in the window" would I do something like: Est feles in fenestram ?

Or is there another way?


-Yvonne Rathbone
Read more : "there is" translation | Views : 1509 | Replies : 9 | Forum : Learning Latin

Exercise 107, Part II, Question 1

English: "The sturdy farmers of Italy labor in the field with great diligence".

My translation: Agricolae validi Italiae in agris cum diligentia magna laborant.

The key's translation: Agricolae validi Italiae magna cum diligentia in agris laborant.

I think the basic meaning is the same but I am confused a little on the word ordering. Is my word ordering wrong compared to the key or does it matter?

I also came up with different word orderings ...
Read more : Exercise 107, Part II, Question 1 | Views : 2727 | Replies : 3 | Forum : Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge

Exercise 107 Part II Question 2

I have a question on #2.

English: "Sextus, the lieutenant, and (his) son Mark are fighting with the Germans".

My translation: Sextus legatus et suus filius, Marcus, cum Germanis pugnant.

The key's translation: Sextus legatus et filius Marcus cum Germanis pugnant.

Why is there no need for suus (his) in the translation?
Read more : Exercise 107 Part II Question 2 | Views : 2568 | Replies : 4 | Forum : Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge

Some pronunciation help, please?

Hello! One of my favourite quotes is 'Vincit, qui se vincit.'
However, I don't know how to pronounce it correctly! If somone could
possibly give me a phonetic version of that sentence, I would be grateful!


Read more : Some pronunciation help, please? | Views : 3211 | Replies : 5 | Forum : Learning Latin


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