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Intratext

yet another collection of Latin texts, including some really quite obscure ones.

http://www.intratext.com/LAT/

A cool feature of this one is that it has a concordance. Click on a word, and it will show you all the other times that word is used and its context in the same work.

Unfortunately it doesn't have a parser. So if you look up for example paucos, you'll only see examples of paucos ...
Read more : Intratext | Views : 1839 | Replies : 4 | Forum : Open Board


That evil subjunctive!

I am not satisfied with how Wheelock taught the subjunctive, and I just want to know how one might say certain things. I also hate the fact that in the readings in the back, I will see a word in the subjunctive that I don’t understand, look at the helpful area at the bottom to find out why, and it says: “Why in subjunctive?” Agh! I don’t know; so don’t ask me, Wheelock! I flip ...
Read more : That evil subjunctive! | Views : 1461 | Replies : 10 | Forum : Learning Latin


two questions

I have two grammatical questions, both sort of related. According to my grammar book after a verb of saying or thinking you get the infinitive.
It gives the example:

Dicit Romanos arma adversariis tradere.

Very nice indeed.

But how would you translate a sentence like

"he says the romans are willing to surrender their arms to the enemy"

and what about an imperative

""come in" she said."
Read more : two questions | Views : 966 | Replies : 7 | Forum : Learning Latin


A Walrus Called Shagbat

This topic is not related with Greek or Latin, but, as this board is open...

During WWII, the British FAA used the Supermarine Walrus three/four seats single-engined biplane amphibian aircraft (How do you say that with a single German word?) for SAR missions. This aircraft was dubbed a "Shagbat" by his crews.

My question is : what is a shagbat ? Following a book about British military aircraft, a shagbat was "a legendary bird, whose ...
Read more : A Walrus Called Shagbat | Views : 647 | Replies : 1 | Forum : Open Board


Ch 32 'sic inviderit'

P&R 6, At volumus cognoscere cur sic inviderit et cur...
But we wish to learn why he is sic jealous, and why...

I'm not quite sure how to translate 'sic' in that sentence. I though it meant so/thus/in this way, as in 'don't do it that way, do it sic.' But if I just plug 'so' into that phrase, it seems to mean 'so (very) jealous'. But if that were the meaning, wouldn't 'tam' be ...
Read more : Ch 32 'sic inviderit' | Views : 2657 | Replies : 2 | Forum : Wheelock's Latin


Benissimus' Wheelock's Answers - A Wheelock Answer Key

The Benissimus answer key is no longer available on Textkit.

Adult learners in search of the answer key may contact academic@harpercollins.com for more information.
Read more : Benissimus' Wheelock's Answers - A Wheelock Answer Key | Views : 103301 | Replies : 18 | Forum : Wheelock's Latin


Tu atque cuius exercitus

To keep the fun in translating I have taken up the habit of translating songs that are stuck in my head. Today it was 'you and whose army' by radiohead. Now, I have a few questions of translation, are these correct?

you think drive me crazy
putas me insanum agere

you think you can take us on
putas nos vicendi potere

for the holy roman empire
pro sancto imperio romano

tonight we ride ghost horses ...
Read more : Tu atque cuius exercitus | Views : 586 | Replies : 2 | Forum : Learning Latin


Ch 32 irregular adverbs

In Wheelock, on page 220, it says "in the following table, adverbs that do not follow the standard rules for forming adverbs from adjectives are highlighted". But male is highlighted, implying that it is an irregular formation from malus. But it seem to follow the rules to me: add -e to the stem mal-.
I can see the irregularities in all the other highlighted forms, - is the highlighting simply reminding readers that these are ...
Read more : Ch 32 irregular adverbs | Views : 3442 | Replies : 4 | Forum : Wheelock's Latin


re: self-test

Forum:

Can I have these confirmed as properly translated?

These sentences stem from "Latin Via Ovid-A First Course-2nd Edit.-1982."

From page 17:

1. Once upon a time there was (est) a beautiful girl.

--Olim erat puella pulchra. Or, Olim puella pulchra erat.


2. Europa lives in Phoenica.

--Europa in Phoenica habitat.


3. Jupiter desires the beautiful maiden.

--Iuppiter puellam pulchram desiderat.


4. The god changes himself into a bull.

--Deus se in taurum transformat.


5. ...
Read more : re: self-test | Views : 581 | Replies : 3 | Forum : Learning Latin


Textkit forums and Google

For the curious...

I have been trying for a while now to get this forum more digestible by the Google bot. The session ids that are tacked onto the urls when a visitor is not logged in are killing us. I did apply a new hack to the forum this week that should help.

Let us hope!
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=& ... gle+Search

we're up to 2 pages so far...
Read more : Textkit forums and Google | Views : 2856 | Replies : 22 | Forum : Open Board


 

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