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Question: Chapter 6, P&R #11

I have a question regarding Practice & Review #11.

Therefore, we cannot always see the real vices of a tyrant.

My translation of this is:
Non semper videre possumus, igitur, vera vitia tyranni.

I found this translation online at ancienthistory.about.com:
Non possumus igitur vitia vera tyranni semper videre.

Assuming the online answer is correct, why wouldn't semper videre come before the postpositive conjuntion with possumus as a complimentary infinitive?

Rob Carignan
Portland, Maine
Read more : Question: Chapter 6, P&R #11 | Views : 1022 | Replies : 1 | Forum : Wheelock's Latin


Nu

Sometimes a nu appears in the end of the third person singular imperfect which I cant see in the paradigms. Other words also have a nu sometimes in the end, like some forms of to be or some prepositions; why?
Read more : Nu | Views : 2045 | Replies : 3 | Forum : Homeric Greek and Early Greek Poetry


eu and eu

lesson 95

This might be too obvious for a question. But just to make it sure, in lesson 95 of Pharr e)u/ is breathed at e, while accented at u. And this Homeric form of eu] means it is pronounced like eh-ü(u with Umlaut) rather than eh-oo?
And e)uknh/midej like eh-ü-kneh-mi-des?
Read more : eu and eu | Views : 4466 | Replies : 5 | Forum : Homeric Greek and Early Greek Poetry


h&q Chapter 11 English to Greek

Could someone look at these English to Greek sentences, please?
The topics of this unit are:
1. Imperatives
2. Deponents
3. au)to/j
4. Temporal Clauses
5. Genitive Absolutes

1. You yourselves used to hear Demosthenes whenever he began a speech. Express the temporal clause in two ways.

au)toi\ ga\r tou= Dhmosqe/nouj h)kou/ete e)pei\ logou= a)\caito.

au)toi\ ga\r tou= Dhmosqe/nouj logou= a)rxame/nou h)kou/ete.


2. After the poet is honoured by the noble young ...
Read more : h&q Chapter 11 English to Greek | Views : 1579 | Replies : 8 | Forum : Learning Greek


First Post

Ok, as it is my first post ,and I am going to ask a lot from you all, I will try to introduce myself. I'm a young guy under siege in a hot south american country called Brazil. Here in my bunker I try to escape from this hideous event called carnival (ugh!) and thanks god I can hear no samba from my new home. Meanwhile I study languages by myself; I'm actually reading The ...
Read more : First Post | Views : 975 | Replies : 5 | Forum : Open Board


Xenophon's Greek

Part of my exam in the summer involves an unseen from anywhere in Xenophon's works. Obviously this means that we are meant to learn all that we can about Xenophon in the meantime.

Does anyone know where to start to learn about typical features of Xenophon's greek? (apart from reading loads of Xenophon, which I'm doing already)

thanks
Read more : Xenophon's Greek | Views : 862 | Replies : 2 | Forum : Learning Greek


Attic Nights

Anyone know of or have a favorite (student) edition of Aulus Gellius' Attic Nights?

Amazon seems to produce only a single student edition, and it goes for the absurd price if $193.71 (which cannot possibly be right).
Read more : Attic Nights | Views : 678 | Replies : 4 | Forum : Learning Latin


translation of litterās

I am somewhat confused by the translation of litterās as the singular 'letter'. For example, in the Practice and Review of Wheelock's ch. 11, sentence #4 is given as
vosne easdem litteras ad eum mittere cras audebitis?
which is translated in Benissimus' key as

Will you dare to send the same letter to him tomorrow?

litterās looks to me like a feminine accusative plural (first declension noun). Is this simply one of those nouns (like ...
Read more : translation of litterās | Views : 858 | Replies : 6 | Forum : Learning Latin


"countless" and "countless" :)

What's the semantic difference between muri/oi kai\ a)perei/sioi?

I can't quite tell, but I think the former simply means "uncountable" for a noun while the latter would be used for some intrinsic aspect of something, like "his limitless rage".

Or, do they both simply mean the exact same thing? When would I use one over the other?

Also, is there a word: perei/sioj? I get the impression that there is, but it isn't in any ...
Read more : "countless" and "countless" :) | Views : 4881 | Replies : 6 | Forum : Homeric Greek and Early Greek Poetry


Another ambition fulfilled

...
Read more : Another ambition fulfilled | Views : 2432 | Replies : 16 | Forum : Open Board


 

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