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re: self-test

Forum:

Can I have these confirmed as properly translated?

These sentences stem from "Latin Via Ovid-A First Course-2nd Edit.-1982."

From page 17:

1. Once upon a time there was (est) a beautiful girl.

--Olim erat puella pulchra. Or, Olim puella pulchra erat.


2. Europa lives in Phoenica.

--Europa in Phoenica habitat.


3. Jupiter desires the beautiful maiden.

--Iuppiter puellam pulchram desiderat.


4. The god changes himself into a bull.

--Deus se in taurum transformat.


5. ...
Read more : re: self-test | Views : 586 | Replies : 3


The Subjunctive in indirect questions

I understand that interrogative words need to go in there, or num for a yes or no question, but are there any other constructions that I should watch out for? I was reading A&G today talking about infinitives in rhetorical questions. Basically this needs an expert to answer in English that I may understand. It was really strange, A&G had loads of pages on indirect speech, most of which I did not understand. There were ...
Read more : The Subjunctive in indirect questions | Views : 2031 | Replies : 9


the majesty of multiplicity

afternoon (alter as necessary) all,

couldn't help but noticing that posts are created far too rarely here, so i thought i ought create one.

it's brief and perhaps even borders on miniscular, but there is a competitive (that's right episocus/benissimus inter alia) edge to it.

if we take the verb incendo to mean "i burn" (trans.), please could i have FIVE different translations of the grammatical form

INCENDERE

That is, there are five instances in ...
Read more : the majesty of multiplicity | Views : 916 | Replies : 6


#1 Subjunctive verbs in indirect questions

From N&H, Page 3, Exercise 1

1. Tell me why you are afraid.
2. We do not know what he is doing.
3. I do not know how many ships there were.
Read more : #1 Subjunctive verbs in indirect questions | Views : 1658 | Replies : 4


Mystery letter

I know some of the Medieval letters are a bit unusual, but does anybody know what the symbol that looks like a cursive, lower-case Z is? I see it every now and then in Medieval Latin and am trying to remember. It is the reason why "videlicet" was shortened to "viz"... that's all I can remember.
Read more : Mystery letter | Views : 1130 | Replies : 7


Can 'U' always be substituted for 'V'?

I recently learned that 'U' can be substituted for a 'V' in some latin words to make them more understandable to a modern reader.
So if i changed: "malum diluere" into "malum dilVere" Would it still have the same translation? (to dissolve evil)
I know this sounds like a very stupid question but to be fair, im a very stupid guy.
Read more : Can 'U' always be substituted for 'V'? | Views : 893 | Replies : 5


Which method do you like?

Hi all - just been having a look at the two beginner's latin books available here at textkit. I have some other texts myself too, mostly old Spanish textbooks which I actually like becuase I like moving from latin to spanish but i also want to use an english manual. I was wondering which book people prefer between the d'ooge and the collar and grant.

I like the idea of reading caesar but also want ...
Read more : Which method do you like? | Views : 1532 | Replies : 11


Translation Assistance

I've never studied Latin before. I am trying to translate the phrase "Always seek the truth", with the verb in the imperative tense.

By using a dictionary and grammer guide, I translated it as:

"veritas semper quaereo" but was told that "veritas semper petendus" was more accurate. I could not find the verb pertendus in any dictionary. Is this true?
Read more : Translation Assistance | Views : 1128 | Replies : 6


A portkey

A friend and I have recently begun wondering about how to translate a certain term from an English book into Latin. More specifically, it's the word "portkey", created by the author of Harry Potter. In short, a "portkey" is a thing that can be used to instantly transport people from one place to another. However, we find it very difficult to come up with a Latin expression for this, especially because we'd like this Latin ...
Read more : A portkey | Views : 663 | Replies : 3


Gerunds and Present Participles

Am I right in saying that the present participle is the adjective and gerund is the noun? The -ing forms are totally different.

And what is what I just said in Latin :?

Thanks :)
Read more : Gerunds and Present Participles | Views : 690 | Replies : 2


 

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