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2nd Year Latin

The next story, about gladiators, starts
Romani e spectaculis gladiatoriis magnam voluptatem capiebant.
Qua in re cernebatur non tam bellicosum populi Romani ingenium quam prava volgi indoles.

The Romans took great enjoyment from the gladiator tournaments. something something was perceived not as the warlike disposition of the Romans as the corrupt character of the common people. Qua in re - is qua here referring to the enjoyment? Which, in the matter was perceived... still doesn't ...
Read more : 2nd Year Latin | Views : 1128 | Replies : 8


Second Year Latin - Greenough, D'ooge and Daniell

I have just started reading Second Year Latin, and can't understand a couple of bits already! In the second story, Cock-fighting, there is the sentence:
Bello Persico Themistocles cum exercitu iter in hostis faciebat, cum duos gallos vidit in via dimicantis.
During the Persian war, Themistocles was travelling into enemy territory with his army, when he saw two roosters fighting in the road.
With in hostis, I thought that in must be followed by acc ...
Read more : Second Year Latin - Greenough, D'ooge and Daniell | Views : 990 | Replies : 6


Ovid Study Group

Just out of curiosity, would there be any interest in an Ovid study group?
I have been thinking a lot about this :D
I don't know exactly what works of Ovid we could concentrate on as he wrote so much.
If there is any interest in this, let me know!

Dean
Read more : Ovid Study Group | Views : 6066 | Replies : 24


bringer

Hi,

As far as I know Lucifer means "Bringer of Light". Can "fer" be appended to a genitive noun to make "Bringer of ***"?

Thanks
Read more : bringer | Views : 874 | Replies : 2


Writting in Latin

I think you web is great.
The old book are very usefuly when you want to learn writte in latin.
I self-study latin (not in any scholl). it`s my hobby.
I studied some years and know it well in reading (i read for example all books of cesar and Livius now I think about Cicero or tacit).
But my writting latin always was very bad.
I think the rason was books. I an Polish and ...
Read more : Writting in Latin | Views : 476 | Replies : 1


Quick Help

Hi I was wondering if anyone could help me here?

I am looking for some latin phrase to go on my sword.

I was thinking of using my clan's motto: "Per Mare, Per Terras", but slightly changing it to "Per Mare, Per Terras, Per Astra".

Now my question is does that say, "By Sea, By Land, By Stars" Or would it be better with "the" in "By (the) Stars"?

Or does this sound any better: ...
Read more : Quick Help | Views : 897 | Replies : 7


Latin imperatives

Does anyone have any definitive comments to make on the TO/TOTE form of the imperative? I had always learned that it was a 'future' or 'strengthened' form of the simple imperative, with TO for the 2nd person singular, TOTE for the 2nd person plural, and sometimes ANTO/UNTO for the 3rd person plural. My problem is that in the Kennedy grammars the TO form (as in 'amato') is listed as being used for the 3rd person ...
Read more : Latin imperatives | Views : 2155 | Replies : 15


You singular formal?

SALVETE OMNES, S.V.B.E.V.

Is there a you singular formal tense in Latin?
Every Romance language I have encountered shares the 3rd person singular (he, she, it) with you singular formal.
But I haven't encountered such a thing in any of the Latin grammars yet.

MVLTAS GRATIAS!
Read more : You singular formal? | Views : 556 | Replies : 2


"glubit" from Catullus

in Catullus 58, he says:
Catullus wrote:Caeli, Lesbia nostra, Lesbia illa,
illa Lesbia, quam Catullus unam
plus quam se atque suos amavit omnes,
nunc in quadriviis et angiportis
glubit magnanimi Remi nepotes.


1. Is quam in line 2 adverbial ("how Catullus loves...") or is it a relative adjective ("which one girl...")?

2. What is the intended meaning of glubit? It literally means "to strip the bark off/to peel", but also can mean "to rob". The first ...
Read more : "glubit" from Catullus | Views : 3927 | Replies : 7


Funny question concerning Seneca...

This is sort of rude but the passage from the Apocolocyntosis that Wheelock added for some silly reason. It goes:
Ultima vox eius haec inter homines audita est, cum maiorem sonitum emisisset illa parte qua facilius loquebatur: "Vae me, puto, concacavi." Quod an fecerit, nescio - omnia certe concacavit!


I understand what it means but I am unsure about the qua. "He had sent out a sound from that part from which he easily spoke..."? ...
Read more : Funny question concerning Seneca... | Views : 1649 | Replies : 5


 

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