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Here's where you can discuss all things Latin. Use this board to ask questions about grammar, discuss learning strategies, get translation help and more!

present infinitive vs present infinitive active

Hi I've got the following phrases (I didn't know any latin until today)
"amo aqua , egeo in aqua vivere"
I would like them to mean:
"I love water, I want to live in water"

What I got is that vivere is in present infinitive active and if I would take for example redire that is in present infinitive. is vivere correct grammatically in this case, or should it be for example "vivo"?
Also, is ...
Read more : present infinitive vs present infinitive active | Views : 631 | Replies : 4

relatively simple translation (?)

Our family coat of arms has a knights helm with a "be ready!" motto..

There must be a dozen translations for readiness in Latin, but I cannot for the life of me figure out the most legitimate for a coat of arms..

It's been many years since I studied Latin, and of course my old latin teacher is currently out of the country.. Please can anyone help with this translation? I believe it would have ...
Read more : relatively simple translation (?) | Views : 461 | Replies : 3

what does?

what does WHAT mean in latin, is it QUID or QUOD

for eg. QUID me nutrit me destruit
or is it
QUOD me nutrit me destruit

or am i completely wrong about it all......

im sorta new to this. Surfing the net and i came across this forum thought id check it out.

Cheers :)
Read more : what does? | Views : 3669 | Replies : 22

Double negatives in Latin

The other day I came upon the phrase, "Is non modo hoc non perfecit." (It was followed by an 'ut' clause.) Try as I might, I simply couldn't get a meaning to fit.

That got me thinking about double negatives. I know in English double negatives are awkward and boorish and gramatically incorrect, but are they allowed in Latin? (Or maybe I'm just missing something completely....^_^;;)
Read more : Double negatives in Latin | Views : 1115 | Replies : 10


i've been learning latin by myself using D'Ooge's book and i do like it ! it's simple, good exercises and very useful for anyone who doesn't know so much of grammar (even if english isn't their mothertongue... spanish's mine ;))


i've been having problems lately; i'm on lesson XVII (before conjugations), and i see there's a lot of vocabulary, declensions, etc, to learn (not a problem ...
Read more : Problems | Views : 553 | Replies : 5

This is a weird translation, but...

How do you translate "genie"? Like the dude in Aladin, the celestial thingy in the lamp, you know. I am writing a buddhist requiem for someone who passed away in latin, this was her nickname, so any help would greatly be appreciated.
Read more : This is a weird translation, but... | Views : 1216 | Replies : 11

Meat is Murder translation please?

Read more : Meat is Murder translation please? | Views : 1789 | Replies : 14

Translation help

Someone asked me to translate the following into Latin:

"Therefor I speak Latin and you do not."

My Latin sucks bigtime, I started learning it some time ago but I can't find the time right now. I need to start over anyway ;). This is all I could find:

proinde = "therefor"
loquor latine = "I speak latin"

I'm not sure if I should use loquor or ...
Read more : Translation help | Views : 976 | Replies : 7

face = fac ut?

Nepos' Life of Pausanias has this letter from Pausanias to Xerxes (2:3-4)

`Pausanias, dux Spartae, quos Byzantii ceperat, postquam propinquos tuos cognovit, tibi muneri misit seque tecum affinitate coniungi cupit. Quare, si tibi videtur, des ei filiam tuam nuptum. Id si feceris, et Spartam et ceteram Graeciam sub tuam potestatem se adiuvante te redacturum pollicetur. His de rebus si quid geri volueris, certum hominem ad eum mittas face, cum quo colloquatur.'

This word 'face' is ...
Read more : face = fac ut? | Views : 440 | Replies : 1

Why is the genitive & genus of every substantive indicat


Beeing a beginner in latin, I have some questions:
In my latin book, all substantives are presented in this way: puella,-ae (f), vinum, -i (n) etc. Isn't it redundant to specify the genus and genitive? Isn't it obvious from the ending what the genus and the genitive of the word are? Since all the books I've seen so far indicate them, there surely must be some importance to this information.

Read more : Why is the genitive & genus of every substantive indicat | Views : 1197 | Replies : 8


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