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Here's where you can discuss all things Latin. Use this board to ask questions about grammar, discuss learning strategies, get translation help and more!

Best book to start with?

I would like to get opinions on which book is better to start with--

Beginner's Latin Book by Collar and Daniell or
Latin For Beginners by Benjamin L. D'Ooge?

Pros, cons of each? Thanks!

Barbara
Read more : Best book to start with? | Views : 6684 | Replies : 7


Translation & Gramma

I got the following sentence that is unclear to me. It'S :

Populus quotannis duos consules et alios magistratus creabat. Consulatus apud Romanos erat summus magistratus. In bello consules exercitum convocabant et exercitui praeerant. In pace autem magistratibus mandatum erat statum civitatis firmare et domos civium et magnas et parvas a scleribus servare.

What does the beginning of the last sentence means exactly ("In pace autem magistratibus mandatum erat statum ...) ?

Why it is ...
Read more : Translation & Gramma | Views : 330 | Replies : 1


N&H Preliminary Ones

I have just started N&H and would like some assurance that I am on the right track. These are a selection from the Preliminary Execrcises, which are not covered in the key. Also, please comment on word order if I need to improve.
Gall is separated from Britain by the sea. Gallia e Brittania mari dividitur.
We have taken the camp. Castra occupabamus/occupavimus. - I'm not sure if this should be perfect or imperfect.
Do ...
Read more : N&H Preliminary Ones | Views : 544 | Replies : 4


Grammatical question

When I say "I have to go" in Latin, since I'm a female should I say "opa est mihi discedenda" or "opus est mihi discedenda." Is "discedenda" even right? I really need to brush up on my gerunds and gerundives!

Also, when I say "I am worried/annoyed" should I use "vexo" or "vexar" because "I am worried" is the same as "I worry."
Read more : Grammatical question | Views : 857 | Replies : 9


The Anatomy of Melancholy

This is the title of a book described thusly at Amazon.com:

One of the major documents of modern European civilization, Robert Burton’s astounding compendium, a survey of melancholy in all its myriad forms, has invited nothing but superlatives since its publication in the seventeenth century. Lewellyn Powys called it “the greatest work of prose of the greatest period of English prose-writing,” while the celebrated surgeon William Osler declared it the greatest of medical treatises. And ...
Read more : The Anatomy of Melancholy | Views : 405 | Replies : 2


favorite quote

Post your favorite Latin quote, if you will.
Read more : favorite quote | Views : 401 | Replies : 2


How many of you pronounce...

v as w, and how many pronounce it as v? Just wondering, I was taught to pronounce it as w but sometimes I hear people pronounce it as v.
Read more : How many of you pronounce... | Views : 3269 | Replies : 25


Translation & Gramma

I've got the following sentence that is not clear to me:

Id est senatores.

It's out from a story about Romulus choosing people for the senate.

Is it : there is senators or there are sentors.

and what's about the converguence of nomen and verb. Why isn't the sentence so: iis sunt senatores ???

Thanx
Read more : Translation & Gramma | Views : 551 | Replies : 5


Grates!

I just stumbled across something unexpected in my Latin dictionary. The entry is:

grates, f. pl. thanks; grates agere, to express thanks; ~ habere, to feel gratitude.


Now, for as long as I can remember, I've used the phrase gratias tibi ago to thank someone. Looking below at "gratias," I see that the same expressions with "agere" and "habere" are used with "gratias" and "grates" alike, meaning essentially the same thing, it would appear.

I ...
Read more : Grates! | Views : 485 | Replies : 1


Latin Prose

Salvete, omnes!

I had a question about the time used in Latin prose. I've read how the Romans occasionally used the "historical present" tense in narration, rather than the perfect tense. How often did they use this? Would they have used it for a lengthier narrative composition such as in the genre of a short story or novel, or instead the past perfect?

Gratias!
Read more : Latin Prose | Views : 514 | Replies : 3


 

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