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Here you can discuss all things Latin. Use this board to ask questions about grammar, discuss learning strategies, get help with a difficult passage of Latin, and more.

affectio societatis- translation?

Does this mean mood of the society?

Thanks,
-Jonathan.
Read more : affectio societatis- translation? | Views : 333 | Replies : 1


Different Ages of Latin?

I'm sorry if this has already been extensively discussed, but I have done numerous searches and come up with no threads. I looked in Wikipedia, but the articles were not extensive enough

What is the linguistic difference between the different Ages of Latin?

Old Latin
Golden Age Latin
Silver Age Latin
Late Latin
Medieval Latin
Humanist Latin
New Latin

Are the differences very great, or more similar to the difference between contemporary English and Shakespearean ...
Read more : Different Ages of Latin? | Views : 915 | Replies : 9


Homework check, please.

My first Latin homework. Is there a kind soul who can tell me if I passed?

Caesar is taking Rome.
Caesar Romam tenet.

He has Britain.
Brittaniam habet.

Caesar has a reputation.
Caesar gloriam habet.

Brutus is creating a disaster.
Brutus calamitatem facit.

Calpurnia is creating art.
Calpurnia artem facit.

Calpurnia is making dinner.
Calpurnia cenam facit.

Caesar is creating a city-state.
Caesar civitatem facit.

Caesar is building a city.
Caesar urbem facit.

Rome has ...
Read more : Homework check, please. | Views : 924 | Replies : 8


carrus/currus

Beginner's question.

A text I've been perusing offers carrus, defining it as a cart or waggon. But then later, in the examples, it uses currus instead. My Latin reference lists both words, defining carrus as a four-wheeled baggage waggon, and currus as a chariot or car, especially for racing or war.

What's the real story on these two nouns?
Read more : carrus/currus | Views : 316 | Replies : 1


idioms

does anyone know of any good (available) books or websites that list and explain latin idioms, especially in relation to the evolution of word meanings.

with other languages, i've found that idioms give me a better understanding of the words used in the idioms and often even the language itself. i'm hoping latin is no different.

i thought of just doing a google search, but i don't think i'm good enough at latin to judge ...
Read more : idioms | Views : 411 | Replies : 3


Meanings of two words

Hello all!

1) I would like to know the meaning to the dark (black) color. My dictionary (WORDS), says the following about it:

=>atrum
ater, atra -um, atrior -or -us, aterrimus -a -um ADJ
black, dark; dark-colored (hair/skin); gloomy/murky; unlucky; sordid/squalid;
deadly, terrible, grisly (esp. connected with underworld); poisonous: spiteful

A friend of mine said the correct word should be "artror" or "artroris", but that's what my dictionary says about both of them:

artro, artrare, ...
Read more : Meanings of two words | Views : 589 | Replies : 5


Translation, if you please?

Hey folks. Non-latin person here, in need of a translation of something for a logo I'm creating for my work.

"Victory Not Vengeance" would be the phrase.

Any help on this would be much appreciated... I've always loved Latin, but have yet to find the time to start learning... maybe now that I've stumbled into this forum I can start working on it, finally!

Thanks in advance!
Read more : Translation, if you please? | Views : 435 | Replies : 3


A little help please

Hello,

I am attempting to teach myself Latin and would like a second opinion on two sentences.

1. To the men's sons they give pretty books.
Filiis virorum pulchri liberi donant.

2. They dwell in Greece, a rough country of Europe.
Graeca terra aspera Europae habitant.

The lesson is on apposition if that helps.

Steven
Read more : A little help please | Views : 503 | Replies : 4


Horace and Ovid: 2 questions

1. In Horace's Carmen III, 30 (Exegi monumentum) I understand most of the text, except for the last sentence:

Sume superbiam
Quaesitam meritis et mihi Delphica
Lauro cinge volens, Melpomene, comam.

Could someone, please, give me a quck tour on the cases used here (esp. 'meritis') and give me a literal translation?

2. In Ovid's Tristia III, X, I got lost in the following sentence:

Pellibus et sutis arcent mala frigora bracis,
oraque de toto ...
Read more : Horace and Ovid: 2 questions | Views : 1404 | Replies : 7


Gender bending locus

Salvete,

i read in D'Ooge that the plural of masculine (2nd decl) "locus" is declined in the neuter.

Wha'apen?

My inference is that the oddity is indeed one of gender, rather than just an irregular form that so happens to be indistinguishable from a gender change. Is that accurate and can someone explain to me how this behaviour came about?

Secondly, albeit more practically, can i expect to find this with any other nouns?
Read more : Gender bending locus | Views : 327 | Replies : 3


 

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