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kai usage

So, suppose I want to say something like "many dreadful noises" (accusative), would I say it like this:

polla\j deina\j klagga/j

or like this:

polla\j kai\ deina\j klagga/j?

I think I'm supposed to do the latter form....

Thanks.
Read more : kai usage | Views : 2457 | Replies : 2


Nu

Sometimes a nu appears in the end of the third person singular imperfect which I cant see in the paradigms. Other words also have a nu sometimes in the end, like some forms of to be or some prepositions; why?
Read more : Nu | Views : 1756 | Replies : 3


eu and eu

lesson 95

This might be too obvious for a question. But just to make it sure, in lesson 95 of Pharr e)u/ is breathed at e, while accented at u. And this Homeric form of eu] means it is pronounced like eh-ü(u with Umlaut) rather than eh-oo?
And e)uknh/midej like eh-ü-kneh-mi-des?
Read more : eu and eu | Views : 3531 | Replies : 5


"countless" and "countless" :)

What's the semantic difference between muri/oi kai\ a)perei/sioi?

I can't quite tell, but I think the former simply means "uncountable" for a noun while the latter would be used for some intrinsic aspect of something, like "his limitless rage".

Or, do they both simply mean the exact same thing? When would I use one over the other?

Also, is there a word: perei/sioj? I get the impression that there is, but it isn't in any ...
Read more : "countless" and "countless" :) | Views : 3848 | Replies : 6


Malcom M. Willcock's Editions of the Iliad

Are they any good?

Are there better ones out there?
Read more : Malcom M. Willcock's Editions of the Iliad | Views : 1541 | Replies : 2


Pharr - Lesson VI - number 4 - English to Greek

I have a question about the translation of this sentence:

"The evil plague makes countless Achaeans a booty (pl) for many birds."

The translation appears to be this:

nou=soj kakh/ teu/xei muri/ouj )Axaiou\j e)lw/ria oi)wnoi=si polloi=si.

My question is: What part of grammar is "a booty"? I ask myself "what is the direct object of makes", and I get back "countless Achaeans", so I put them into the plural accusative case. However, "a booty" seems ...
Read more : Pharr - Lesson VI - number 4 - English to Greek | Views : 2313 | Replies : 2


Iliad line 5, pa^si or dai^ta?

Pharr says dai=ta, but I know that at least some books say pa~si.

Pharr also said that the Iliad segments in his book haven’t been altered, so I presume both words are acceptable.


Is this sort of thing common in Greek verse?
Read more : Iliad line 5, pa^si or dai^ta? | Views : 2773 | Replies : 3


Declension question

Hello,

I'm on Lesson VI in Pharr's book and it is explaining the second declension. My question is do nouns only belong to a single gender and declension (suppose first declension feminine
for a word like boulh/) while adjectives must have a male, female, and neuter declension? And that the adjectives gender is "chosen" out of the set of available declensions, like: kalo/j, kalh/, kalo/n--which are second declension male, first declension feminine, and second declension ...
Read more : Declension question | Views : 3193 | Replies : 3


Stanley Lombardo Reads Iliad Book I

I was hoping that somebody could comment on the accuracy of Stanley Lombardo's reading of Iliad Book One. Should I use it to study the Homeric line, or would it promote bad habits? Are there other/better readings available online? Are there any readings that can be downloaded?

Thanks. :D
Read more : Stanley Lombardo Reads Iliad Book I | Views : 29137 | Replies : 62


Lesson XLIII, paragraph 283

Lesson XLIII, paragraph 283

a)faireo/meqa basilh=a Xrushi/da to\ ge/raj kalo/n.

I believe this is saying something like "We are robbing the king of Chryses' daughter, the beautiful prize." What's confusing me is that both basilh=a and Xrushi/da blah blah are in accusative. Is this how it's supposed to be, or is there some meaning (i.e. that Chryses' daughter is a king, which makes little sense in context) that I'm missing. I have a ...
Read more : Lesson XLIII, paragraph 283 | Views : 2837 | Replies : 2


 

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